VicPol Corporate

Message from Chief Commissioner Shane Patton

I am proud to introduce the Victoria Police Workforce Diversity and Inclusion Framework 2023–2030 (Framework).

This Framework reaffirms the commitment Victoria Police made in 2017, in our first diversity and inclusion framework, to create a workplace that is safe and inclusive of all our people.

We aim to attract and welcome more people from diverse backgrounds to join Victoria Police so that our workforce increasingly reflects the range of backgrounds and experience we find in the community. We must do this if we are to provide service delivery excellence to the whole community.

Changing our workforce composition and our culture takes a conscious effort from us all to seek to know better, and to do better.

I pledge that any form of discrimination in Victoria Police will not be tolerated, and I will ensure every one of our leaders and employees are supported in delivering this pledge.

We have made progress towards ensuring safe, inclusive and respectful workplaces exist across Victoria Police.

We will continue to improve by creating and supporting workplace cultures that value challenging conversations about the way we work and support each other.

Victoria Police is only as good as our people. To have the best workplace we must support our people to reach their full potential without discrimination or barriers.

I am confident that this framework and the set of action plans for its implementation will expand our understanding of our people’s needs and create positive change.

Shane Patton APM
Chief Commissioner, Victoria Police

Decorative photo of Shane Patton, APM Chief Commissioner, Victoria Police. He is smiling and in Victoria Police Dress Uniform.

About the Victoria Police Diversity and Inclusion Framework 2023–2030

The Victoria Police Workforce Diversity and Inclusion Framework 2022–2030 informs the action we take through plans including the:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Inclusion Action Plan (coming soon)
  • Access and Inclusion Action Plan
  • CALD Inclusion Action Plan
  • LGBTIQ+ Inclusion Action Plan.

Acknowledgement statement

  • Victoria Police respectfully acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the country throughout Victoria.

    We pay our respects to Elders, past, present and emerging and continue to recognise and embrace the fact that Aboriginal People are connected to the oldest, continuous culture and history.

  • Victoria Police proudly acknowledges the First Peoples of Victoria and their ongoing strength in practicing the world’s oldest living culture.

    We acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the lands and waters on which we live and work and pay our respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

    We acknowledge the invaluable contributions of all those who have paved the way and fought for the rights of Aboriginal people, including the right to Self-Determination.

    We recognise the continuing leadership of the Victorian Aboriginal community and our employees, who have contributed and paved the way, to creating a more inclusive and culturally safe workplace.

    In the spirit of Self-Determination, Victoria Police is committed to strengthening our partnership with the Victorian Aboriginal community, as we continue to embrace diversity and equity across our organisation.

  • Language is a powerful tool for promoting inclusion, shifting attitudes and combating negative stereotypes.

    We know that language is constantly evolving and we recognise that people from diverse backgrounds have different preferences for how they describe their heritage, ethnicity, race, culture, gender expression, sexual orientation, sex characteristics and disability.


Date:
February 2023

Introduction

Victoria Police’s role is to serve the Victorian community and uphold the law so as to promote a safe, secure and orderly society. To achieve this we need to be as diverse and varied as the communities in which we work.

A diverse workforce provides innovation, diversity of thought and leadership and allows Victoria Police to better understand and respond to community needs.

This Framework aims to continue to build an organisation united by excellence in serving the community through embracing our diversity and differences.

We know that organisations where a diverse range of ideas, aptitudes, backgrounds, and knowledge can flourish are more successful in making us agile, effective, and efficient.

This framework has been built in the context of a decade of evidence and reflection on our employee experiences, our workforce culture and the systems and structures that support it.

Our journey started with commissioning independent reviews and audits of our performance on equality. This included the Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission’s (VEOHRC) 2015 Independent review into sex discrimination, sexual harassment, including predatory behaviour in Victoria Police and Proud, Visible, Safe which responded to workplace harm experienced by LGBTIQ+ employees in Victoria Police.

The findings of both reviews defined the gaps in our systems and processes and revealed the tangible opportunities to improve. The findings serve as a powerful reminder that our success as a policing service begins and ends with our success as an employer.

Discrimination, bias and disadvantage not only harm our employees – they also run counter to the reason Victoria Police exists and our community remit built on human rights.

  • Keeping communities safe depends on our people feeling safe.
  • Driving community inclusion relies on a workforce that feels included.
  • Upholding the rights of every individual effectively requires understanding and respect of different needs, perspectives and contributions from each and every one of our employees.

The data from each review, the trends in our People Matter Survey analyses over the last 10 years, and the feedback from consultation with our employee networks, unions, researchers, and subject matter experts, serve as the foundation of this Framework. The Framework marks the next evolution of our core diversity and inclusion action plans – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD), Accessibility, and LGBTIQ+.

This Framework strives to bring diversity, inclusion and a sense of purpose and belonging into the leadership and operational frameworks of our organisation. It mirrors and supports Victoria Police’s 10-year gender equality strategy, Equal, Safe and Strong. Both plans share an ethos of long-term transformation, building knowledge, capability, performance, and accountability across the organisation to build a diverse and progressive police force, one the Victorian community requires.

Regular action plans will hold us accountable for achieving identified outcomes and commit the organisation to effect positive, sustainable change for diverse employees.

The Framework’s five broad sections are:

  1. What are we talking about?
  2. How far we’ve come
  3. Where do we want to be?
  4. How are we getting there?
  5. How are we holding ourselves accountable?

Our vision

  • Victoria Police leads the way in creating a diverse workplace and an inclusive organisation.
  • All Victoria Police employees work in a safe workplace where they are treated with dignity and respect.
  • All Victoria Police systems, policies and processes provide all employees with fair and equitable access to resources and opportunities.
  • Victoria Police’s workforce composition reflects the diversity in the community.
  • Victoria Police’s culture values diversity – all employees recognise that a truly excellent policing service is possible only with a diverse workforce that is reflective of the community it serves.
  • All Victoria Police employees feel supported to reach their full potential and are connected, valued and empowered to succeed.

Strategic environment

This framework is aligned to Victoria Police strategic policies and Victorian and Commonwealth legislation. Each creates the foundation of our work and provides essential parameters for developing our action plans.

Over the timespan of the Framework, we will continually review our approach to providing a safe, inclusive and accessible workplace in response to national and Victorian initiatives as they occur.

Figure 1: Strategic environment

Figure 1: Strategic environment
  • Safe and Strong: A Victorian Gender Equality Strategy
  • Inclusive Victoria: state disability plan (2022–2026)
  • Pride in our future: Victoria's LGBTIQ+ strategy 2022–32
  • Victorian. And Proud Of It: Victoria’s Multicultural Policy Statement
  • Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework 2018–2023.
Download Figure 1: Strategic environment

Relevant legislation

Equal Opportunity Act 2010

The Equal Opportunity Act recognises that access to opportunities is not equitably distributed through society and that discrimination can cause social disadvantage.

Under the Equal Opportunity Act, employers have a positive duty to eliminate discrimination, sexual harassment and victimisation as far as possible for protected characteristics.

Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities Act 2006

The Charter requires all public authorities (including Victoria Police) to ‘properly consider’ and ‘act compatibly’ with 20 protected human rights in decision making.

The Charter includes a right protecting individuals from discrimination (s.8 Recognition and equality before the law), protecting people’s cultural rights (s.19), and their safety (i.e. a right for all people, including in a work context, to feel safe and be safe, (s.20 protection of liberty and security of person).

Gender Equality Act 2020

The Gender Equality Act was passed in February 2020 and commenced in March 2021. It requires the Victorian Public Sector, including Victoria Police, to report on, plan for and progress gender equality for all genders.

Sex Discrimination Act 1984 (Clth)

The Sex Discrimination Act, together with state and territory anti-discrimination laws, provides the primary framework for understanding and addressing sexual harassment as a form of sex discrimination, and recognises the right to work in an environment free from sexual harassment.

Victoria Police Act 2013

The Victoria Police Act is the primary legal instrument regulating the objectives, structure and powers of Victoria Police.

Public Administration Act 2004

The Public Administration Act places an obligation on public sector employers to establish processes to ensure employment decisions are based on merit, employees are treated fairly and reasonably, equal employment opportunity is provided, human rights are upheld, employees have access to reasonable avenues of redress, and a career in public service is fostered.

Fair Work Act 2009 (Clth)

The Fair Work Act governs the employment relationship between employers and employees in Australia, and provides protections of employees including minimum entitlements to minimum wage, leave, and flexible work to ensure a fairer workplace.


What are we talking about?

What is diversity and inclusion?

Diversity is about what makes each person unique and includes our backgrounds, personality, life experiences and beliefs.

It is a combination of the visible and invisible differences that shape our view of the world, our perspective and our approach1.

Diversity may typically be seen as manifesting through attributes such as gender identity, sex characteristics and sexual orientation, ethnicity, language, faith, ability, age, mental health, socioeconomic status, housing status or geographic location.

It is the embodiment of all forms of diversity that enables and drives inclusiveness. Inclusion occurs when people feel a true sense of belonging and value regardless of their personal characteristics, circumstances or background.

What is intersectionality?

Intersectionality is an approach to understanding how social meanings relate to the way we categorise and self-identify can overlap and interconnect. This creates different layers and types of discrimination or disadvantage for either an individual or group.

Categories include gender, sexual orientation, sex characteristics, ethnicity, language, faith, class, socio-economic status, ability and age.2

The benefits of diversity and inclusion

There is clear evidence to demonstrate that achieving inclusion as a diverse organisation benefits our people, our organisation and our community.3

Reduced workplace harm

By bringing greater diversity to our workplaces, we will create an environment that prevents discrimination and workplace harm from occurring.

An inclusive workplace culture encourages treating people as individuals who are valued for their own skills and abilities.4

A more capable and modern police force

Evidence shows that diverse and inclusive teams are more productive and creative.

By removing discriminatory barriers to career advancement, we ensure that we have access to the full talent pool and build a workforce that reflects the capabilities and values of a modern policing organisation.5

Enhanced community trust of police

When diversity in the Victoria Police workforce better reflects the diversity in the Victorian community, we increase community trust in our ability to police with credibility, capability and accountability.

A workforce that understands the drivers of discrimination and prejudice motivated crime delivers better service.

With better understanding, we can address the drivers of discrimination internally, and better respond to Victoria’s diverse communities, keeping victims safe and holding perpetrators to account.6

Where are we at?

Victoria Police participates in the Victorian Public Sector Commission’s People Matter Survey.

The survey provides valuable insight into our culture and safety from employee perspectives. In 2021, 6889 Victoria Police employees responded to the People Matter Survey.7

People Matter Survey responses to "There is equal employment opportunity within my organisation"

A pie chart with responses from Victoria Police's 2021 People Matter Survey. For the prompt "There is equal employment opportunity within my organisation", 17% of respondents disagreed, 30% were neutral and 53% agreed.
People Matter Survey responses to "There is equal employment opportunity within my organisation"
  • Disagree: 17%
  • Neutral: 30%
  • Agree: 53%
Download People Matter Survey responses to "There is equal employment opportunity within my organisation"

People Matter Survey responses to "I feel culturally safe at work"

A pie chart with responses from Victoria Police's 2021 People Matter Survey. For the prompt "I feel culturally safe at work", 10% disagreed, 17% were neutral and 73% agreed.
People Matter Survey responses to "I feel culturally safe at work"
  • Disagree: 10%
  • Neutral: 17%
  • Agree: 73%
Download People Matter Survey responses to "I feel culturally safe at work"

1 Only skin deep? Re-examining the business case for diversity, Deloitte 2011
2 Victorian Government Department of Families, Fairness and Housing 2022, Pride in our future: Victoria’s LGBTIQ+ strategy 2022–32, Victoria, Australia
3 Saxena, A. (2014) Workforce diversity: A key to improve productivity. Procedia Economics and Finance, 11(1), 76-85.
4 Victorian Equal Opportunity Human Rights Commission (VEOHRC) (2019) Independent Review into sex discrimination and sexual harassment, including predatory behaviour in Victoria Police. Phase 3 audit and review, Victorian Equal Opportunity Human Rights Commission, Melbourne, Australia.
5 Ibid.
6 Victorian Equal Opportunity Human Rights Commission (VEOHRC) (2019) Proud, Visible, Safe, Victorian Equal Opportunity Human Rights Commission, Melbourne, Australia.
7 Rounding of percentages: People Matter Survey round numbers up or down to their nearest whole percentage. This means some percentages may not add up to 100 per cent.


How far we've come

Victoria Police has undertaken some significant work since the release of the 2018 Framework and associated action plans.

We will maintain the momentum gained from our ongoing relationship with VEOHRC which led to a more knowledgeable workforce with increased expertise and capability to drive inclusion initiatives, with a greater focus on intersectionality.

Victoria Police’s commitment to transforming its approach to gender equality and diversity through the use of evidence-based outcomes was demonstrated in 2020 by the creation of a dedicated Gender Equality and Inclusion Command. This commitment to maintaining an internal centre of excellence dedicated to equality, diversity and inclusion, continues in 2022 through the funding of a permanent Gender Equality and Inclusion Division integrated into the newly created Human Resources Command (HRC).

We deliver this Framework on the back of progress in all areas of diversity and inclusion with some key achievements across each portfolio.

Silver Employer Australian Workplace Equality Index 2021

Celebrating excellence in LGBTIQ workplace inclusion silver employer 2021 from the Australian Workplace Equality Index. The Australian Workplace Equality Index is Australia's definitive national benchmark on LGBTQ workplace inclusion produced annually by Pride in Diversity.
Silver Employer Australian Workplace Equality Index 2021

Celebrating excellence in LGBTIQ workplace inclusion silver employer 2021 from the Australian Workplace Equality Index.

The Australian Workplace Equality Index is Australia's definitive national benchmark on LGBTQ workplace inclusion produced annually by Pride in Diversity.

Download Silver Employer Australian Workplace Equality Index 2021

Why is this still a problem?

Despite some significant achievements since 2018, Victoria Police acknowledges that overall progress in workforce diversity and inclusion has been limited, with disparate levels of improvement across portfolios.

Whenever there is progress towards diversity and inclusion, some dominant groups can resist change and attempt to hinder or impede progress. Independent evaluations of the 2018–2021 LGBTIQ, CALD, Aboriginal, and Accessibility strategies and action plans provided the organisation with some common themes and insights into where gaps and barriers continue to exist.

Most notably, the evaluations pointed to issues of culture, safety, governance, and leadership as most problematic in hindering progress. This is consistent with what we have heard from our employee representative groups and through our People Matter Survey results.

Culture

Awareness and understanding of diversity and inclusion across the organisation remains limited.

Entrenched systems and structures have continued to favour select groups while creating multiple and complex barriers for others.

Although our inclusion initiatives have made a positive contribution, pervasive dominant cultural issues continue to harm our diverse employees.

Safety

Systems and processes that aim to support workplace safety are limited in capability and lack culturally appropriate responses.

Provision of generic services for employee wellbeing and workplace harm complaints has contributed to concerns for the safety of employees in diverse groups.

Governance

An absence of strong governance around diversity and inclusion within Victoria Police has hampered progress and slowed decision-making.

Evaluations of the previous strategies and action plans were consistent in highlighting the need for a comprehensive governance and authorising framework to support diversity and inclusion and drive transformational change.

Leadership

Diversity and inclusion capability at all levels of leadership across the organisation remains low.

This has contributed to maintaining a culture of status quo and reduced the reach and impact of previous actions. Beyond the four areas highlighted, there is recognition that discrimination, bias and unequal access to opportunity exist for many of our employees.

Career advancement for diverse employees continues to be hampered by barriers across the employee lifecycle. These issues are complex, engrained and are interlinked across all aspects of the organisation. Achieving a truly diverse workplace and inclusive organisation requires a long-term commitment.

7% of employees that experienced discrimination submitted a complaint.

66% of employees agree that senior leaders actively support diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

Source: Leadership & Safety – People Matter Survey 2021

In 2021, Victoria Police’s primary human resources IT system was enhanced to capture data about each employee’s sex, gender, sexuality, languages, culture, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status and if a person has a disability.

Because this is a new feature, diversity figures currently appear lower than might be expected. However, as more employees report their diversity data Victoria Police will obtain a greater understanding of the diversity and needs of our employees.

This data provides a valuable benchmark to monitor our future progress.

Workforce data

LGBTIQ+

  • Employees who identify as gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, pansexual, queer, asexual or different orientation: 0.76%

Disability

  • Employees with disability: 0.77%
  • Employees who do not identify: 99.23%

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

  • Employees who identify as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander: 0.57%
  • Employees who do not identify: 99.43%

Culturally and linguistically diverse

  • Culturally and linguistically diverse employees: 15.56%
  • Employees from main English speaking countries: 84.44%

Source: HR Assist – June 2022.


Where do we want to be?

Inclusion Continuum

The Diversity and Inclusion Program Logic (Appendix 1) provides a schematic representation of how Victoria Police will work towards a truly diverse workplace and inclusive organisation. The program logic will provide the strategic framework to map future progress through targeted outcomes and action plans.

The program logic sets out how we will progress along the Inclusion Continuum, a visual model, which was recently updated to identify five stages on a development continuum. Each stage describes the diversity and inclusion consciousness and culture of an organisation regarding diversity and inclusion.8

The 2017–2020 Diversity and Inclusion Framework used the Inclusion Continuum as a measure of our organisational progress on our journey to becoming an inclusive organisation.

In 2017, we considered that as an organisation we were between the compliant (recently updated to be named reactive) and proactive phases of the continuum. This was based on the organisation’s level of confidence and capability within diversity and inclusion.9

Following the evaluations of the 2018–2021 action plans and the organisation’s performance in the People Matter Survey an updated assessment of Victoria Police’s progress against the updated definitions of the inclusion continuum was conducted. In 2021 Victoria Police remained within the reactive to proactive range.

Each diversity portfolio will undertake a similar journey along the program logic outcomes. However, each portfolio will likely start to display the inclusive characteristics outlined in the program logic at different times. Victoria Police has developed individualised action plans for each diversity portfolio in recognition that each will need unique support to ensure maturity along the inclusion continuum.

Inclusion Continuum

A diagram of the Inclusion Continuum. For diversity and inclusion, Victoria Police is placed between the "reactive" and "proactive" level. The scale ranges from Exclusive to Reactive, then Proactive, then Progressive and finishes with Inclusive.
10 For further explanation see Appendix 3: Definitions of the inclusion continuum stages.
Inclusion Continuum

Exclusive: An organisation that values the dominant group culture, excluding others.

Reactive: Few members from other groups are accepted, yet are expected to conform to dominant norms.

For diversity and inclusion, Victoria Police is placed between the "Reactive" and "Proactive" level.

Proactive: Organisation is internally motivated however, the dominant group notices a challenge to culture, resulting in backlash.

Progressive: Barriers to diversity are actively dismantled in all systems, structures and culture.

Inclusive: All types of diversity are valued. An environment where all people are valued for who they are and what they bring is maintained.

Download Inclusion Continuum

Outcomes creating an inclusive organisation

A diverse workplace and inclusive organisation

Progressive and inclusive outcomes to create a diverse workplace and inclusive organisation at Victoria Police.
A diverse workplace and inclusive organisation

Progressive outcomes

  • Inclusion is embedded in the cultural identity of Victoria Police
  • Leaders proactively create and sustain inclusive workplaces
  • Diverse employees feel empowered at work
  • Employees have confidence in response to discriminatory workplace harm
  • Discriminatory workplace harm is minimised
  • The diversity of Victoria Police strengthens services delivery to the community.

Inclusive outcomes

  • Victoria Police champions inclusion
  • Leaders harness diversity and inclusion to achieve organisational results
  • Employees feel valued and have a true sense of belonging
  • The community has trust in our response to diverse communities.
Download A diverse workplace and inclusive organisation

While the path to inclusion may appear linear, each outcome has a ripple effect across all outcomes.

We will build an inclusive organisation through a deliberate and evidence-based focus on these outcomes:

Progressive outcomes for Victoria Police

Inclusion is embedded in the cultural identity of Victoria Police

Victoria Police has undergone the journey of understanding the benefits of a diverse workforce and leaders and employees have driven inclusion within their workplaces.

A diverse workforce is embedded and celebrated within modern policing culture, making Victoria Police an organisation of choice for diverse people.

Leaders proactively create and sustain inclusive workplaces

Leaders understand the benefits of diversity and how they can improve performance and wellbeing, incorporating this into their leadership practices.

Leaders will be empowered to proactively create inclusive workplaces through clear organisational expectations, underpinned by innovative policy, practice, systems and training uplift.

Fit-for-purpose data metrics will ensure workplace leaders are owning and driving diversity and inclusion by providing equal access to rights, responsibilities, and opportunities.

Diverse employees feel empowered at work

By strengthening the content and delivery of our policies, practices and training, all employees feel empowered to make choices about their work and career, free from discrimination or backlash.

Diversity within our culture is celebrated and the benefits of inclusive workplaces is understood. This provides the environment for diverse employees to feel empowered, supported and celebrated within their workplaces.

Employees have confidence in our response to discriminatory workplace harm

Through the progress of this framework Victoria Police will establish strong accountability in the removal of workplace harm and discrimination.

Behavioural expectations will be firmly established, ensuring the removed of discrimination or bias in the creation of an equal workforce.

Employees will know that reports of workplace discrimination or harm will be swiftly addressed through a victim-centric approach with fair and effective outcomes.

Discriminatory workplace harm is minimised

Through primary prevention strategies this framework aims to create a culture and environment that is hostile to perpetrators of workplace harm and discrimination.

When it does occur, we will ensure a comprehensive victim-centric response is enacted to prevent continued harm and hold perpetrators to account.

The diversity of Victoria Police strengthens effective police response to the community

By creating a modern police force, one that acknowledges past histories and provides the systemic and cultural organisational reform required to create a safe workplace for diverse communities, Victoria Police can attract a workforce as diverse as the Victorian community.

With enhanced diversity we can better understand and respond to community needs, promoting community trust in policing responses.

Inclusive outcomes for Victoria Police

A diverse workforce and an inclusive organisation

Our end goal of a diverse workforce and an inclusive organisation is defined by the following outcomes:

Victoria Police champions inclusion

As a leader in diversity and inclusion, our organisation will attract employees who have a contemporary understanding of a modern police officer.

The strength of our culture will ensure new employees subscribe to our equality values and drive a safe and respectful future.

Leaders harness diversity and inclusion to achieve organisational results

Leaders at all levels of the organisation take ownership and proactively sustain diversity and inclusion.

Leaders drive progress in their departments, commands, regions, divisions, stations and within their teams.

Employees feel valued and have a true sense of belonging

All employees will come to work and feel safe, included and respected.

Victoria Police’s culture is one of community and values diversity within our workplace.

Protected attributes are considered in all policy, procedure and decision-making, placing employee wellbeing at the heart of our organisation.

The community has trust in our response to diverse communities

With a strong employer brand, Victoria Police progresses the notion of policing as a profession that embraces differences.

The community will have trust in a safe and respectful policing response for people from diverse communities.

With greater accessibility to an enhanced police response, victims feel confident in seeking police assistance.

8 B. Jones and Michael Brazzel 2014, The NTL Handbook of Organization Development and Change: Principles, Practices, and Perspectives.
9 Please note since 2018 Dr. Angela Workman-Stark has improved the definitions within the Inclusion Continuum to better align to evidence-based
diversity and inclusion standards. The previous Inclusion Continuum (2018) included 6 pillars: exclusive, passive, compliant, proactive, redefining and inclusive. Please see the 2018–2021 Diversity and Inclusion Framework for expanded definitions.
10 For further explanation see Appendix 3: Definitions of the inclusion continuum stages.


How are we getting there?

Victoria Police's plan to achieve a diverse workforce and inclusive organisation

We have developed and tested the Diversity and Inclusion Program Logic (Appendix 1) with our key partners and stakeholders.

The program logic will support the overall actions for all portfolios, and inform the individual portfolio action plans.

No specific end date can been established to achieve an inclusive organisation, because each portfolio will reach this state at different times.

When all diversity portfolios have met the inclusive outcomes, Victoria Police will have reached its goal of having a diverse workforce and being an inclusive organisation.

Across the life of this framework, we will oversee three action plans in each portfolio:

  • first action plans (2023 – December 2024)
  • second action plans (2025 – December 2027)
  • third action plans (2028 – December 2030).

Who is involved?

To achieve a diverse workplace and an inclusive organisation, Victoria Police needs ongoing commitment from all our people, regions, commands and departments. Working in partnership is essential for the framework’s success and the implementation of portfolio action plans.

Human Resources Command values our internal and external partners which include:

  • Executive Command
  • Capability Department
  • Digital Services and Security Department
  • Media, Communications and Engagement Department
  • Operational Infrastructure Department
  • People Development Command
  • Professional Standards Command.

How are we holding ourselves accountable?

Monitoring and evaluating our progress

This Framework and the program logic are supported by a monitoring, evaluation and learning (MEL) framework.

The program logic demonstrates the outcomes that are required to progress Victoria Police along the inclusion continuum from reactive to inclusive. Each action plan will progress these outcomes through targeted supportive actions.

A dedicated MEL for each action plan will monitor the progress of the actions against their key milestones and performance indicators to inform the next iteration of action plans.

Planning, implementation and evaluation cycle

Diversity and Inclusion Framework -Planning, implementation and evaluation cycle
Planning, implementation and evaluation cycle

Action plan: The Action Plan provides the details of the areas we will be focusing on with our partners.

Implementation and monitoring: We will continually monitor our program of works to make sure we are heading in the right direction.

Evaluation: We have the opportunity to evaluate our efforts and to adjust, if necessary, our program of works.

Download Planning, implementation and evaluation cycle

Acronyms and shortened forms

Acronym Definition
ACAT Aboriginal Cultural Awareness Training
AND Australian Network on Disability
AWEI Australian Workplace Equality Index
CALD Culturally and Linguistically Diverse
DCR Disability Confident Recruiter
EAP Employee Assistance Program
GEIOC Gender Equality and Inclusion Outcomes Committee
HRC Human Resources Command
LGBTIQ+ Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer and/or questioning
MEL Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning
ToR Terms of Reference
VEOHRC Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights
Commission
VPDRP Victoria Police Diversity Recruitment Program
VPS Victorian Public Service
WoVG Whole of Victorian Government


Glossary

We define key terms below and acknowledge that people have different definitions. Language has changed and continues to evolve.

Discrimination

The unjust or prejudicial treatment of different categories of people, especially on the grounds of race, age, sex, or disability.

Discriminatory workplace harm

This umbrella term covers any way a person experiences discrimination, harm or violence based on protected characteristics within the Victorian Equal Opportunity Act.

Gender Equality and Inclusion Outcomes Committee

The Gender Equality and Inclusion Outcomes Committee is the current authorising and governing committee that sits over gender equality in Victoria Police.

The committee is being expanded to include diversity and inclusion.

Program logic

A program logic model is a schematic representation that describes how a program is intended to work by linking activities with outputs, intermediate outcomes and longer-term outcomes.

Protected characteristics

Employees have the right to be free from discrimination based on protected characteristics within the Victorian Equal Opportunity Act.

These characteristics include age, parent and carer status, disability, employment activity, expunged homosexual conviction, gender identity, industrial activity, lawful sexual activity, marital status, physical features, political belief or activity, pregnancy and breastfeeding, race, religious belief or activity, sex, sex characteristics, sexual orientation, personal association with someone who has, or is assumed to have, one of these personal characteristics.

Workplace harm

Workplace harm is the detrimental effects of being targeted by all forms of inappropriate behaviour from work colleagues including sex discrimination, gender-based bullying, sexual harassment and assault, predatory behaviour, victimisation, workplace conflict and bullying.


Appendix 1: Diversity and inclusion program logic

Problem

An engrained culture and systemic bias has amplified inequality and impeded diversity.

Goal

A diverse workplace and inclusive organisation.

Principles

  • Engaging hearts and minds
  • Equitable outcomes
  • Employee co-design
  • Licence to challenge
  • Evidence based.

Key assumptions

  • That diversity and inclusion will be a priority for the organisation
  • That diversity and inclusion is also a priority for lead command and departments
  • That the goal of inclusion continues to be adequately resourced
  • That the community values a police force that is reflective of the people it serves.

Barriers

  • Current policies, processes and training perpetuates systemic inequality
  • Inherent requirements of policing are poorly defined
  • Some key data measures and systems are not fit-for-purpose
  • Lack of clarity and accountability for managers in their response to discriminatory workplace harm
  • Lack of knowledge and understanding of diversity and inclusion.

Appendix 2: Diversity and inclusion actions and milestones 2023-2024

The following are actions that stretch across and impact all four diversity portfolios and align to the outputs and first outcomes identified in the Diversity and Inclusion Program Logic (Appendix 1).

Although these actions are being generically applied across all four portfolios, when applied to each individual portfolio they will take on the explicit focus for LGBTIQ+, CALD, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Accessibility.

These actions are complementary to the individual and targeted actions that appear in each of the inclusion action plans.

  • Portfolio: All

    Strategic intent Key milestones/measures Owner

    The problem: limited knowledge, understanding and awareness of diversity and inclusion amongst managers.

    What we’re doing: enhancing diversity and inclusion capability in people managers.

    How we will do it: by developing and promoting a diversity and inclusion resource hub targeted at leaders and people managers.

    • Conduct a literature review of existing mandatory WoVG and other jurisdiction diversity and inclusion training packages, to inform the development of the resource hub.
    • Review and identify gaps and opportunities in existing training/engagement programs.
    • Develop the diversity and inclusion management resource hub.
    • Diversity and inclusion management resource hub is integrated into existing people management training.

    HRC

  • Portfolio: All

    Strategic intent Key milestones/measures Owner

    The problem: current Victoria Police induction and onboarding content lacks comprehensive information on employee networks and other employee diversity and inclusion information.

    What we’re doing: ensuring that all new employees are aware of the organisation’s diversity and inclusion values, standards, resources and support.

    How we will do it: a review of current induction and onboarding processes will identify opportunities to create and embed new materials addressing current gaps in diversity and inclusion.

    • Review current police, protective services officers and VPS induction and onboarding content and identify opportunities to incorporate diversity and inclusion content.
    • Implement recommended content changes to ensure there is consistency in how new employees across Victoria Police are introduced to diversity and inclusion.
    • Establish a process of regular review that includes consultation with HRC and employee networks.

    PDC

  • Portfolio: All

    Strategic intent Key milestones/measures Owner

    The problem: communications and engagement for diversity, equity and inclusion is limited and lacks an overarching strategy or plan.

    What we’re doing: improving knowledge and understanding across the organisation of inclusion for employees with disability and culturally and linguistically diverse, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and LGBTIQ+ employees.

    How we will do it: by including active communications and engagement tactics.

    Develop, execute and evaluate an organisational Diversity and Inclusion Communication and Engagement Strategy.

    HRC

  • Portfolio: All

    Strategic intent Key milestones/measures Owner

    The problem: employee networks have different levels of influence, support and visibility depending on the rank and position of their members, and their nominated champion’s level of involvement.

    What we’re doing: strengthening employee networks and introducing consistency to support all groups to have greater strategic influence in Victoria Police.

    How we will do it: by developing a consistent process of support and executive advocacy that will apply to all employee networks.

    • Set benchmark requirements that all employee networks are entitled to.
    • Review each group against benchmark requirements.
    • Provide support to employee networks to ensure that all networks have an Executive Command Sponsor and a Command portfolio lead.
    • Develop a process to ensure there is consistent support, influence and advocacy across all groups.
    • Establish a formal consultation and feedback process.

    HRC

  • Portfolio: All

    Strategic intent Key milestones/measures Owner

    The problem: insufficient governance or authorising framework to support and progress workforce diversity and inclusion.

    What we’re doing: expanding and renaming the Gender Equality and Inclusion Outcomes Committee (GEIOC) to include representation and support for implementing the diversity and inclusion strategy and action plans.

    How we will do it: we will re-scope and expand the GEIOC. The committee will welcome new members and be responsible for monitoring and tracking progress against the inclusion strategies and action plans.

    • Review GEIOC membership and terms of reference (ToR).
    • Develop a proposal in consultation with employee networks including new name, ToR, membership, and governance model.
    • Obtain approval including endorsement from GEIOC and approval from Safety, People and Culture Committee.

    HRC

  • Portfolio: All

    Strategic intent Key milestones/measures Owner

    The problem: organisational response to workplace harm has been identified as an area of focus for improvement by all diversity portfolios.

    What we’re doing: ensuring an intersectional lens is applied to workplace harm reporting and responses.

    How we will do it: by developing training and resources for Victoria Police units that respond to workplace harm and complaints.

    • Develop targeted diversity and inclusion training.
    • Rollout training to all employees managing incidents of workplace harm.
    • Develop processes that ensure new employees engage in the training as part of their induction to workplace harm units.
    • Develop and provide ongoing support/refresher training for existing employees.

    HRC

  • Portfolio: All

    Strategic intent Key milestones/measures Owner

    The problem: complaint pathways and employee support services are not fully inclusive.

    What we’re doing: ensuring that complaint processes and support services are safe, appropriate and inclusive for our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, CALD, LGBTIQ+ employees and those with disability and accessibility requirements.

    How we will do it: we will conduct the review with an inclusive lens.

    • Ensure all workplace harm systems capture employees’ diversity information where relevant to the complaint.
    • Establish a review for workplace harm reporting and wellbeing services referral processes.
    • Review opportunities within existing contract requirements to ensure EAP providers include culturally safe, accessible and inclusive support and referrals.

    HRC/PSC

  • Portfolio: All

    Strategic intent Key milestones/measures Owner

    The problem: previous systems and processes developed for monitoring and evaluating strategies and actions have lacked robustness, creating difficulties in measuring and assessing progress.

    What we’re doing: ensuring Victoria Police can sufficiently assess and monitor the organisation’s material progress towards a diverse workplace and inclusive organisation.

    How we will do it: by developing KPIs for each action across the four strategies and action plans.

    • Review relevant existing data and reporting mechanisms.
    • Determine KPIs and processes to establish baseline data.
    • Establish mechanism for monitoring progress.
    • Develop processes to ensure regular review.

    HRC


Appendix 3: Definitions of the inclusion continuum stages

Exclusive

Exclusive is when there is a dominant group and those who are not within this group are unwelcome and excluded.

Potential indicators that an organisation is in the exclusive phase include, group members are expected to conform with the dominant norms to fit in and be successful; and those who don’t conform are subjected to discrimination, harassment, bullying, and/or isolation.

Reactive

In the reactive phase organisations are responding to external, or internal pressures to undertake change, rather than it being of their own volition, for example legislative requirements or internal mandates for greater diversity.

Potential indicators of reactive are the inclusion of a few members from other groups, yet new members are still expected to conform to dominant norms; application of quotas and targets without changes to internal structures and “outsiders” are still subjected to harmful workplace behaviours.

Proactive

Proactive is the positive move by an organisation to be internally motivated to be more diverse through changes to policies and practices that create opportunities for others. However, these efforts tend to be limited to traditional understanding of diversity and not included in overall organisational strategy.

Risks in this phase include mandatory diversity training is assumed to overcome bias and discrimination and the dominant group notices a challenge to culture, resulting in backlash.

Potential indicators of proactive include one off mandatory diversity training, the application of targets or quotas, there are limited ‘tokenistic’ positions tasked with influencing organisational diversity.

Progressive

Progressive is the phase where organisations advance beyond traditional diversity and inclusion and understand and appreciate the social justice of diversity. There is greater understanding of the importance to include all people. Barriers to diversity are actively dismantled in all systems, structures and culture.

Potential indicators include employees are encouraged to voice their concerns about exclusionary and other harmful behaviours without fear of repercussions; and efforts are underway to redefine the images of the “ideal” worker through training, awareness, and changes to selection policies.

Inclusive

Inclusive organisations are characterised as those in which diversity and inclusion are viewed as integral to success rather than obstacles to be overcome. All types of diversity are valued, and ongoing efforts are undertaken to support and maintain an inclusive environment.

Indicators include employees report feeling safe, valued, and fully engaged, barriers to diversity and inclusion are removed; exclusionary behaviours and related forms of workplace misconduct are actively reported and quickly addressed; decision-making processes are perceived as consistent, fair, and bias-free.


Reviewed 26 February 2023